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June 5, 2018 — California Primary Election

Supervisor, District 5 — San Diego County

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About this office

Supervisors implement and refine local applications of state laws and public policy, and supervise the official conduct of public officers in the county.
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Candidates

You can vote for 1 of these 4 candidates.

Jim Desmond

San Marcos Mayor, Airline Captain,...
Top 3 Priorities
  1. Public Safety, ensuring fire and law enforcement have...
  2. Fiscal Responsibility, balanced budgets and strong...
  3. Sound infrastructure and reduced traffic congestion.
Profile
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Michelle Gomez

Legislative Analyst
Top 3 Priorities
  1. Protect our County General Plan to stop overdevelopment...
  2. Ensure access to Public Health and Human Services...
  3. Protect our coastline and strengthen fire and environmental...
Profile
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Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern

Oceanside City Councilmember
Top 3 Priorities
  1. Ensuring North County receives the services we deserve
  2. Fighting for our fair share of public safety funding
  3. Protecting public safety
Profile
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Jacqueline Arsivaud

Board Chair, Elfin Forest Harmony...
Top 3 Priorities
  1. Prevent San Diego from turning into Orange County...
  2. Reduce traffic congestion and gridlock by developing...
  3. Protect public safety via investment in fire protection...
Profile
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Mayor of San Marcos
58,417 votes (38.5%)Winning
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Candidate has provided information.

My Top 3 Priorities

  • Public Safety, ensuring fire and law enforcement have the resources they need to keep us safe.
  • Fiscal Responsibility, balanced budgets and strong reserves.
  • Sound infrastructure and reduced traffic congestion.

Experience

Experience

Profession:San Marcos Mayor, Airline Captain, Veteran, BSEE
Mayor, City of San Marcos (2006–current)
Captain, Delta Air Lines (1986–current)
Captain, Delta Air Lines (1986–current)
Mayor, San Marcos, City of San Marcos — Elected position (2006–current)
City Council Member, City of San Marcos (2004–2006)
Owner, Technical Standard, Inc (1994–2000)

Education

San Diego State University BS Electrical Engineering, Computer Design (1984)

Biography

Mayor of San Marcos for 12 years. Pilot/Captain for Delta Air Lines for 32 years. US Navy Veteran, Electrical engineering degree from SDSU and former tech-business owner.  Currently serve on the SANDAG Board of Directors, the San Diego Airport Board of Directors, the San Diego County Economic Development Board of Directors and the San Diego and Imperial County Boy Scouts of America Board of Directors.

Married to Kerri for 34 years with two adult children.  North county resident for 26 years.

 

 

 

 

 

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • The San Diego County Republican Party
  • Sheriff Bill Gore and the Deputy Sheriff's Association
  • The Mexican American Business Professionals Association

Elected Officials (2)

  • Supervisor Greg Cox
  • San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer

Questions & Answers

Questions from KPBS and the League of Women Voters (San Diego and North County San Diego chapters) (6)

Should the county spend more of its budget reserves on increasing social services? Why or why not?
Answer from Jim Desmond:

No.  The reserves are right where they should be.

The County's annual budget is $5billion a year, or $13million per day.  The County has approximately $700million in unencumbered (rainy day) reserves which will fund 53 days of normal operations at $13millon/day.  If there is a major fire or earthquake requiring extra services and overtime that leaves a little over a month of normal operations dollars. 

 

Should the county invest more of its budget reserves in its affordable housing trust fund? Why or why not?
Answer from Jim Desmond:

No. See previous answer.  

One third of the $5billion annual budget is already spent on Health and Human Services.  I think those monies should be prioritized eah year to deal with current Health and Human Services issues.

Do you support measures to stop the criminalization of homelessness? The basic human behaviors of many homeless people (like sitting, sleeping and bathing in public) are against the law. Please provide specific examples of measures you would support.
Answer from Jim Desmond:

I will support programs that help people willing to get back on their feet and functioning in society.

Do you support increasing housing density in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jim Desmond:

Depends on the project.

I support projects that fit with the character of the community, mitigates impacts and provides the necessary infrastructure.  For increased densities the project must also provide added benefits to the existing community such as; schools, fire houses, parks, enhanced emergency egress and infrastructure.

Do you support permitting, regulating and taxing marijuana in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jim Desmond:

I am ok with medical marijuana if it was dispensed was a pharmacy and perscribed by real doctors. I am against the retail sales (dispensaries) of recreational marijuana.

Do you support the county’s Climate Action Plan? Why or why not?                                          
Answer from Jim Desmond:

I would support an approved County Climate Action Plan.

Political Beliefs

Fiscal Conservative 

Official Statement

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Supervisors – District No. 5

JIM DESMOND AGE: 61

Mayor of San Marcos/Airline Captain

As Mayor of San Marcos, I delivered balanced budgets with strong reserves, pension reform, a major reduction in crime, and improved infrastructure.

My plan as Supervisor: maintain a fiscally responsible budget, reduce congestion and improve traffic flow on the 78, I-5, and I-15, keep our streets and neighborhoods safe, and our business and agriculture economy booming.

Protecting seniors and veterans is a priority. I will demand oversight of senior and veteran care facilities and work with law enforcement to enforce fraud laws. I will ensure returning veterans’ needs are met.

My balanced approach towards growth preserves community character and ensures essential infrastructure while protecting property rights and open space.

My background: I am a U.S. Navy veteran and a graduate of San Diego State University with a degree in Electrical Engineering. I have been an airline pilot/captain for thirty-two years. After the Navy, my wife Kerri and I settled in North County and raised our two children. I’ve been a Boy Scout leader and school parent/teacher president.

I am running for Supervisor to make North County the best possible place to live. Please join me in this effort.

www.DesmondForSupervisor.com

Candidate Contact Info

Campaign Name: Mayor Jim Desmond for Supervisor
Private Email jdesmo56@gmail.com
Phone: 760-402-0448
Commissioner/Legislative Analyst
29,662 votes (19.5%)Winning
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Protect our County General Plan to stop overdevelopment of our neighborhoods and rural lands, while increasing access to affordable housing to address our County's housing crisis
  • Ensure access to Public Health and Human Services to include wrap around services in order to protect public health for all; address the homeless crisis through increased mental health, substance abuse, job training and placement, and social services
  • Protect our coastline and strengthen fire and environmental protections to preserve our pristine open space

Experience

Experience

Profession:Legislative Analyst
Commissioner, San Diego County Commission on the Status of Women & Girls — Appointed position (2017–current)
Commissioner, Oceanside Housing Commission — Appointed position (2018–current)

Community Activities

Founding Board Member, The Foundation to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance (2012–current)
Member, Lawyers Club of San Diego (2017–current)
Family Readiness Assistant, Marine Corps Family Readiness (2009–2014)
Founding Member/Secretary of Kupa'a Mau Outrigger Canoe Club &, President Southern California Outrigger Racing Association (2007–2014)
Member, National Women's Political Caucus of San Diego (2017–2009)

Biography

A lifelong resident of Southern California, Michelle Gomez originally hails from Cerritos but fell in love with North County San Diego when she first moved here over a decade ago. Since then, Michelle's been on a mission to make this area an even better place than it was when she arrived.

Determined to make a difference by being a doer and not just a thinker, Michelle has been active in community service for almost two decades in a variety of roles assisting military families and veterans, forming community building organizations, serving on the board of patient advocacy organizations, and most recently, fighting human trafficking, homelessness, and domestic violence as a San Diego County Commissioner on the Status of Women & Girls Commission.

In her professional life, Michelle works as a Legislative Analyst reviewing legislation and drafting policy, and has previously worked in affordable housing project management. This combination of community service, familiarity with the issues plaguing our county, and experience drafting and executing effective policy make her ably suited to the role of Supervisor.

​Michelle is a proud military spouse and daughter. Her husband Don served in the Marine Corps and deployed in support of  Operation Iraqi Freedom. Her father was awarded a Purple Heart for his service in Vietnam.

​Michelle has demonstrated her desire to truly support the troops by serving for over half a decade as a USMC Family Readiness Assistant aiding the families of our deployed heroes. For her service to the troops and those they leave behind, Michelle was awarded the President's Volunteer Service Award four times by the Obama administration.

​Michelle’s goal in seeking the County Supervisor, District 5 seat is to end the hoarding of county reserves and put that excess to work building our economy and protecting the resident's of the county by strengthening fire protection, preserving our open space, and increasing access to affordable housing for students, working families, and seniors. 

​Michelle is honored to dedicate her campaign to her grandmother, an early pioneer of the women’s  rights movement, and to American womanhood past, present, and future in the hope that equality and opportunity remain the hallmarks of this nation.

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • San Diego County Democratic Party
  • Sierra Club
  • San Diego & Imperial Counties Labor Council

Organizations (15)

  • OB Rag
  • San Diego Free Press
  • Democratic Club of Vista
  • Sierra Club
  • San Diego County Democratic Party
  • Standing Up For Women
  • Veterans Democratic Club of San Diego County
  • United Domestic Workers/AFSCME Local 3930
  • San Diego Democrats for Equality
  • Woman's Democratic Club of San Diego County
  • Democratic Club of Carlsbad and Oceanside
  • Run Women Run
  • San Diego & Imperial Counties Labor Council
  • Association of Cannabis Professionals
  • SEIU Local 221

Elected Officials (3)

  • Cori Schumacher, Carlsbad City Councilmember, Candidate for Mayor
  • Paul Angulo, Riverside County Auditor-Controller
  • Esther Sanchez, Oceanside City Councilmember

Individuals (18)

  • Diane Nygaard, North County Environmental Activist
  • Amanda Mascia, North County Environmental Activist (No on Measure A, No on Measure B, etc.)
  • Patricia Amador, Delegate North County Latino Democrats
  • Eric Dean, President Emeritus, Veterans Democratic Club of San Diego County
  • Tim Caudill, Secretary, Veterans Democratic Club of San Diego County
  • Wendy Woodard McDowell, Community Organizer, Community Choice Energy for Coastal North County SD
  • Adam Vega, Community Organizer, Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE)
  • Francisco Ramos, President, Riverside County Young Democrats/ADEM District 42
  • Sam Ronan, Candidate for US House of Representatives
  • Tom Cowan, Founder, North County Veterans Stand Down
  • Yusef Miller, Founder, Mosques Against Trafficking
  • Michelle Singleton, Candidate for CA State Assembly, District 67
  • Priya Bhat-Patel, Candidate for Carlsbad City Council
  • Francine Busby, Chair Emeritus, San Diego County Democratic Party
  • Robert Jenkins, Vice President, North San Diego County NAACP
  • Dr. Michael Byron, Professor of Political Science, Green Energy Advocate
  • Robert Leahy, 2nd Vice Chair, California Democratic Party Veterans Caucus
  • Ken Dalpe, Executive Committee Member, North San Diego County NAACP

Questions & Answers

Questions from KPBS and the League of Women Voters (San Diego and North County San Diego chapters) (6)

Should the county spend more of its budget reserves on increasing social services? Why or why not?
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

Yes.

Increased access to health and human services is one of the many reasons I decided to run for County Supervisor. 

San Diego County currently holds a $2 billion (approximately 49%) reserve when most county's function at peak performance with approximately 15-20%. This excessive hoarding of reserves is the primary cause of the recent Hepatitis A outbreak, which was allowed to spread unchecked and ended up killing almost two dozen people while infecting hundreds more. That our current Supervisors allowed such a public health crisis to transpire in order to keep more money in the bank is unconscionable.

We need to utilize these reserves in an efficient and effective manner in order to improve the quality of life for all county residents. These funds should be used to provide affordable and attainable housing, combat our growing homelessness crisis, improve mental health services and create jobs and employ more in home healthcare workers for our aging demographic.  

 

Should the county invest more of its budget reserves in its affordable housing trust fund? Why or why not?
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

Yes.

Increasing access to affordable housing should be priority one when it comes to considering how to best utilize our budget surplus. San Diego County currently has the sixth highest homeless population in the country and 1 in 6 of that number is children. 

If only 10% of our current 2 billion dollar excess were put to work to fund housing development, either through the Innovative Housing Trust Fund, Community Development Block Grants or HOME Investment Partnership which all share access to the same funding source it would improve the situation several times over. These funds could be put to work facilitating construction, acquisition, rehabilitation and also loan repayment for affordable multi-family rental housing for extremely low, very-low and low-income households by providing gap financing.

Do you support measures to stop the criminalization of homelessness? The basic human behaviors of many homeless people (like sitting, sleeping and bathing in public) are against the law. Please provide specific examples of measures you would support.
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

Yes.

Homelessness is not a crime. It is a symptom of societal failures and flawed policymaking. Rather than criminalizing the counties many homeless, including families, veterans, and students, we should be providing increased access to social and mental health services, substance abuse facilities, and job training and placement services.

The County must do more to provide adequate housing for our homeless population, as well as provide public sanitation facilities, including mobile shower options in order to protect public health. 

Do you support increasing housing density in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

No.

Our county has a devastating housing shortage that much is clear.  Housing has to be built somewhere, but where exactly is always the burning question. It seems that nobody wants new housing built in their backyard. 

My approach is to honor the county's General Plan, which suggests that new housing in the unincorporated areas be placed in the Western regions of the county nearer to services, and infrastructure that can support the new influx of residents. This notion is especially prudent when considering new affordable housing developments. Working families want to live near to where they work in order to save time and money commuting. They want to live near parks and schools, not out in the middle of nowhere causing them to have to drive more for family functions, to say nothing of their daily commutes.

On the other side of that coin, you have residents in rural areas who purchased homes in those areas because they wish to be away from urban density. Placing developments on top of them not only robs them of their solitude, but also poses a problem for the sensitive wildlife and ecosystems that will be impacted. We must protect our pristine countryside from overdevelopment because once it's gone, it’s gone forever.

 

Do you support permitting, regulating and taxing marijuana in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

Yes.

I strongly support efforts to regulate, permit, and tax the cannabis industry businesses in the unincorporated areas because patients deserve safe access to the cannabis based medications that are saving, and in some cases improving their lives. They need to be able to access dispensaries or delivery options in their area. Moreover, struggling family farms could once again be made solvent by adopting this crop were they allowed to. Jobs could be created in the growth, delivery, transfer, testing, and sale of a well-regulated cannabis industry. This would be a boon to our economy without consideration to the possible income from taxation.

Laws regarding cannabis have changed and our attitudes and practices need to adapt to the times. Regardless of anyone's personal feelings on cannabis, medical marijuana has been legal in California for over 20 years and with the passage of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (Prop 64) in 2016, recreational adult use is now legal as well. It is time we get our arms around this as a county in order to ensure public safety concerning keeping cannabis products out of the hands of children and to thwart the black market, which will only continue to grow in the absence of regulation.

I have spoken with many cannabis industry leaders, informed and engaged professionals, who are eager to work within whatever legal framework emerges. They share my passion for keeping cannabis out of the hands of children and despise black market bad actors who have left their taint on an industry who is working hard to prove their dedication to observing the law.

Do you support the county’s Climate Action Plan? Why or why not?                                          
Answer from Michelle Gomez:

No, I do not support the County’s Climate Action Plan in its current form. I believe greater emphasis is necessary regarding efficiency and the reduction of greenhouse gasses, which has disastrous effects on our planet. We must place greater emphasis on the portion of the plan that speaks to Greenhouse Gas reduction from automobile traffic by providing alternatives to mass transportation and by building future homes in places that enable residents to reduce their use of personal automobile travel. We must also address sea level rise because it will have dramatic negative impacts on our region and our economy if we fail to act. I believe we should place greater emphasis on clean energy, including solar and wind as well. Finally, I would like to see the Climate Action Plan expanded to include Community Choice Energy (CCE) programs, which promise to reduce emissions by focusing on renewable energy sources. Because CCE takes the power out of the hands out of the energy monopolies working families will also benefit from reduced rates.

Political Beliefs

As your County Supervisor, I will fight to protect our County General Plan to stop overdevelopment of our neighborhoods and rural lands; create new jobs in technology and emerging fields; improve public safety; protect our coastline and open space; improve libraries and parks; fight for Community Choice Energy; and strengthen fire protection. 

Improve the lives of working families – The County needs to ensure that our county workers are paid a livable wage, that they are receiving cost of living increases and that we are filling vacancies when they become available. The County must play a bigger role in increasing access to high quality affordable childcare and preschool, before and after school programs for our children, and at least one nutritious meal per day. 

Homeless Crisis – We need comprehensive solutions to combat homelessness now. It has been statistically proven in other counties that the best way to address homelessness is to build and convert more homes for the homeless and increase resources dedicated to mental health, substance abuse and job training opportunities. 

Affordable and Attainable Housing – San Diego is primarily growing from within and we must dedicate resources to building more affordable housing and supportive housing. We must also build more attainable housing to help first time buyers get into their first purchased home, freeing up some rentals with the goal of alleviating some homelessness. 

Transportation and Mass Transit – San Diego County must become a leader when it comes to investing in proper transportation infrastructure. This means prioritizing projects that that make sense for our communities don’t detract from form the character of our neighborhoods. We must work closely with other local governments to help reduce traffic in our county, reduce air pollution and focus on improving our current systems. 

Environment – San Diego government should play a leadership role in ensuring we are protecting and enhancing our pristine natural resources. This includes more aggressive enforcement of water and air pollution, as well as implementing and providing Community Choice Energy. It is crucial that the County adopt an enforceable climate action plan that actually leads to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Official Statement

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Supervisors – District No. 5

MICHELLE GOMEZ

Commissioner/Legislative Analyst

As your County Supervisor, I will fight to protect our County General Plan to stop overdevelopment of our neighborhoods and rural lands; create new jobs in technology and emerging fields; improve public safety; protect our coastline and open space; improve libraries and parks; fight for Community Choice Energy; and strengthen fire protection.

As a County Commissioner on the San Diego County Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, I’m leading the charge in the fight to end human trafficking, help solve homelessness and stop domestic violence.

As a City Commissioner on the Oceanside Housing Commission, I’m working to generate more affordable housing and supportive housing to end homelessness, and create expanded opportunities for seniors, young people, underserved communities and the disabled.

I’m the proud daughter and spouse of Marine Corps veterans, and am honored to have been awarded the President’s Volunteer Service Award four times for my work in the community assisting military families and veterans.

I’m a forward-thinking problem solver with a proven track record of delivering results. I will give North County the strong voice we need on the San Diego County Board of Supervisors.

I’d be honored to have your vote and go to work for you!

MichelleforSupervisor.com

Videos (1)

Michelle Gomez for County Supervisor, District 5 — April 27, 2018 Michelle Gomez for Supervisor 2018, KOCT

My name is Michelle Gomez, I'm running for County Supervisor because I wanjt to fight for the working families of North County. I'd be honored to have your vote on June 5th!

Oceanside City Council Member
24,804 votes (16.3%)
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Ensuring North County receives the services we deserve
  • Fighting for our fair share of public safety funding
  • Protecting public safety

Experience

Experience

Profession:Oceanside City Councilmember
Councilmember, City of Oceanside — Elected position (2006–current)

Education

San Diego State University BA, Business Administration (1974)

Biography

North County deserves a Supervisor who is on our side – who will fight to protect taxpayers, solve our traffic problems, and grow our local economy with good-paying jobs while standing up to downtown San Diego politicians who don’t understand or care about North County values.

Jerry and his wife, Blake, have lived in Oceanside for over 40 years. While County government is headquartered in downtown San Diego, the decisions made by the Board of Supervisors impact North County’s quality of life every day. From homelessness to healthcare, and from the courts to air quality, North County needs an effective representative who understands our unique challenges and won’t settle for the status quo.

Jerry Kern’s record as an educator and founder of a pioneering charter school, as president of the local Chamber of Commerce, and as an experienced elected official with the courage to say “no” to special interests, ensures that North County will have the effective advocate on the Board of Supervisors that North County deserves.

First elected to the Oceanside City Council in 2006, Jerry also serves on the city’s Economic Development Commission as well as the Arts Commission. Regionally, he represents San Diego County on the Community Engagement Panel for the decommissioning of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) where he is working with state and federal officials to remove the spent nuclear fuel to a safer location.

Jerry is a fiscal conservative who fought to hold the line on city spending, upgrade police and fire protection, get tough on gang violence, address homelessness and the county’s housing crisis. He has worked tirelessly to attract new businesses that have strengthened his city’s tax base and generated hundreds of new jobs.

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • Senator Pat Bates
  • Assemblymember Rocky Chavez

Elected Officials (2)

  • Assemblyman Randy Voepel
  • Oceanside City Councilman Jack Feller

Individuals (2)

  • Former State Senator Bill Morrow
  • Former Assemblyman Bruce Thompson

Questions & Answers

Questions from KPBS and the League of Women Voters (San Diego and North County San Diego chapters) (6)

Should the county spend more of its budget reserves on increasing social services? Why or why not?
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

My philosophy of government is that it should be in the service delivery business. Accumulating excess reserves does not serve the citizens well. After determining what the appropriate level of reserves should be the remainder should either returned to the taxpayers or used for budget priorities.

Should the county invest more of its budget reserves in its affordable housing trust fund? Why or why not?
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

Putting money in a trust fund will never build the amount of hosing that is needed in the County. Lowering the fees and regulations that will allow for more attainable housing to be built will go further in solving the housing crisis.

Do you support measures to stop the criminalization of homelessness? The basic human behaviors of many homeless people (like sitting, sleeping and bathing in public) are against the law. Please provide specific examples of measures you would support.
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

Sitting and sleeping in public are not a problem; it is the other activities that take place that eventually lead to health risk to all of us. The Hepatitis A crisis is an example. I brought the Homeless Outreach Team to Oceanside to assist in making contact with the homeless to see if we can connect them with services.

Do you support increasing housing density in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

I support increasing housing density in the unincorporated area of the Count where appropriate. We need to increase housing and placing more housing along the transportation corridors would be the most appropriate locations

Do you support permitting, regulating and taxing marijuana in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

I support regulating and taxing marijuana in San Diego County. The voters of the state and county passed prop 64 and our jobs as public officals is to carry out the will of the people. I have been working over a year to write the marijuana regulation for Oceanside that deal with cultivation, testing, distribution, manufacturing and dispensing. I would like to take those regulations to the County

Do you support the county’s Climate Action Plan? Why or why not?                                          
Answer from Jerome M. "Jerry" Kern:

Some of it I support, like the reduction of Green House gasses, but I am very concerned that it may add up $15,000 to the price of a new home. The Revised plan has lower that cost but it still has consequences that are detrimental to the housing crisis. 

Political Beliefs

I am running for Supervisor to protect our quality of life and ensure North County receives the services we deserve.

 

If elected, I will fight to protect taxpayers, solve our traffic problems, protect public safety, and grow our local economy with good-paying jobs while standing up to downtown San Diego politicians and special interests who don’t understand or care about North County needs.

 

My wife and I have lived in North County for more than 40 years. I have served as a member of the armed forces, a public school teacher, founder of a pioneering charter school, president of the local Chamber of Commerce, and as an elected official with a record of standing up to special interests.

 

As an Oceanside Councilmember, I have fought to hold the line on city spending, supported pro-jobs policies, upgraded police and fire protection, got tough on gang violence, and addressed homelessness. As a result, Oceanside has brought in high-paying jobs, vibrant restaurants, and new amenities to serve the public.

 

As Supervisor, I will be the effective advocate that North County deserves. That’s why I am supported by local elected officials and community leaders, not downtown politicians and special interests.

A SAFER NORTH COUNTY - MY PLAN TO PROTECT OUR COMMUNITIES

Summary

Public safety is the top priority of our county government. As your County Supervisor, I will fight to ensure our district receives the public safety resources it needs in order to reduce response times and ensure safer communities.

Rebuilding our Probation Department

As a result of new laws that have altered our criminal justice system, our County Probation Department is stretched to the limit.

 

Despite the increase in the overall workload, overtime hours have been cut, meaning that officers have to do more with less time. In certain areas of the county, our probation officers are facing up to double the recommended workload. As a result, some cases are falling through the cracks, particularly in the back country, meaning that dozens of individuals on probation aren’t being adequately supervised.

 

In addition, as a result of AB 109, a number of felons who were previously serving time in state prison were transferred to county jails, meaning they were now being supervised by probation officers -- this entirely new population has created additional challenges.

 

In addition, there are instances when Deputy Sheriffs have encountered individuals on probation who are potentially in violation of their probation terms; however, when the Probation Department is contacted to manage these individuals, understaffing has made it difficult for probation officers to answer these calls in a timely manner, leaving the deputies unable to properly cite or arrest the offender.

 

As a result, morale at the department is low, as officers are overworked and underpaid. Consequently, the department now faces recruiting and retention issues that will only make it even more difficult to provide the staffing necessary to address these new public safety challenges.

 

As County Supervisor, it will be my priority to focus on ensuring our Probation Department is staffed at the levels necessary to monitor offenders in order to keep our communities safe.

 

Maintaining a First-Rate Sheriff’s Department

Our county’s Sheriff’s Department is one of the finest agencies in the entire country, and the men and women who serve on the front lines have been doing an excellent job at addressing crime and quality of life in both contract cities and the back-country.

 

Hiring the most qualified officers didn’t just happen by magic -- it was because our county was willing and able to invest in the department by ensuring competitive compensation in order to recruit new talent and retain experienced deputies. As a Supervisor, I’ll insist on utilizing a salary survey of comparable local agencies to ensure we remain competitive.

 

By maintaining adequate staffing of skilled deputies, we can ensure fast response times, community policing, and a better quality of life.

 

Meanwhile, there are always new and emerging public safety challenges, and it’s important our department is adequately prepared to address them.

 

As a result of new sentencing laws, growing mental health problems, the opioid crisis, and other factors, our deputy Sheriffs are facing new challenges, changing populations, and new areas that need to be addressed. The County Board of Supervisors must be focused on ensuring the department has the adequate staffing and resources to address these new challenges.

 

Resolving unintended consequences of criminal justice reforms

Over the past few years, California has seen a number of changes to its criminal justice system. Most prominent among those changes were made through the Public Safety Realignment Act (AB 109), Reduced Penalties for Some Crimes Initiative (Proposition 47), and the California Parole for Non-Violent Criminals and Juvenile Court Trial Requirements Initiative (Proposition 57).

 

The state Legislature and Governor implemented AB 109, with voters supporting Proposition 47 and 57. Unfortunately, these bills have created a number of unintended consequences within our criminal justice system that need to be addressed.

 

Accordingly, I propose the establishment of a commission to study the impact of state criminal justice reforms throughout our county. Comprised of individuals from law enforcement, non-profits, and the community, this commission would focus on studying the new challenges these laws have created, as well as opportunities on how to best ensure these reforms are working in a manner that protects public safety while still achieving their original goals.

 

While these reforms have been implemented at the state level, there are adjustments we can make at a local level to reduce the negative unintended consequences of these laws.

 

Protecting Our Back Country Communities

As we saw in 2003, 2007, and again in 2014, wildfires can strike at any time and in any place. The County of San Diego has made a number of important strides over the past several years to ensure our regional fire authority has the tools, resources, and policies in place to quickly respond to future fires, but it’s important we remain vigilant in ensuring our firefighters have what they need to get the job done.

 

Accordingly, as your Supervisor, I’ll do the following to ensure our community is as prepared as possible for potential wildfires:

 

  • Diligently monitor response times for all areas of the district in order to identify potential problem spots and ensure resources are being allocated efficiently.

  • Conduct multiple meetings per year with firefighters and local Chiefs to ensure I hear from direct stakeholders regarding the issues they face.

  • Regularly spend time at our county’s fire stations and participate in ride-alongs to absorb information, gather input, and anticipate issues.

  • Look for opportunities to utilize new or outside funding sources to procure equipment or upgrade infrastructure at our fire stations.

  • Work collaboratively with our fire authority and public services department to ensure we reduce debris and bush throughout our county that could be a fire hazard.

 

Conclusion

 

Since public safety should be the top priority of county government, that’s where our focus and resources belong. As your Supervisor, I’ll ensure my constituents and the men and women serving on the front lines have the public safety resources they deserve.

A BLUEPRINT FOR PROSPERITY - AN ECONOMIC PLAN TO GROW NORTH COUNTY’S ECONOMY

Summary

As an Oceanside Councilmember, I’ve had the opportunity to be part of our city’s efforts to revitalize Oceanside city, particularly the downtown area. Not only have we brought desired restaurants, hotels, retail shops, and other businesses, but we did so with community buy-in and approval.

 

By creating a vision for our community, developing and implementing a plan, and working with local stakeholders, we’ve been able to transform our downtown, strengthening our economy and providing hundreds of new jobs in Oceanside.

It’s this same approach I wish to bring to North County. By building a vision and working as a community, we can create a healthy, growing economy over the long-term.

North County is one of the most prosperous and healthy economic regions in our entire state. We’re home to a diverse range of industries including manufacturing, tourism, agriculture, biotechnology, green technology, healthcare, education, and many others.

While our region has seen tremendous economic growth over the past few years, it’s important we continue working to build an economy that can withstand a future recession, is full of high-paying jobs, and offers opportunities for everyone to prosper.

With several cities, dozens of rural communities, as well as tribal nations, North County is a diverse collection of economic regions with unique strengths and needs. Accordingly, the region needs leadership that is able to work collaboratively within this economic ecosystem to implement a unifying vision for the region.

Strengthen Regional Partnerships

  • The county should work closely with influential organizations such as the North San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce and the San Diego North Economic Development Council to identify strategies to recruit and retain businesses of all sizes and industries.

  • Work with universities, manufacturers, and other industries to create partnerships with local school districts to establish a talent pipeline to provide qualified job candidates over the long-term.

  • Assist other local governments to ensure a regional, coordinated approach to advocating policies that will allow businesses to grow and prosper.

  • Through collaboration with other local governments and organizations, we can leverage our regional strength to more effectively secure state or federal grant money devoted toward economic development.

  • Working together, we should establish an economic vision for the region, created through a collaborative, community-based engagement with the region’s public and private partners. The process will provide the region an opportunity for stakeholders and citizens to specify community values, describe our situation, and prioritize our shared goals.

Recruit and Retain Businesses; Grow the Next Generation of Employees

  • Support policies that reduce the cost of living in North County, ensuring companies have plenty of local talent available to hire. With a steady pool of available workers, North County will be a more desirable place for businesses to open their doors.

  • Our region should aggressively work to recruit businesses exploring expansion. We must ensure we are adequately promoting what North County has to offer for businesses and corporations seeking new opportunities for growth.

  • Apply County grant money to programs that implement programs geared toward building skillsets for the next generation of workers and ensuring our youth are prepared and trained to enter a 21st Century Workforce.

Support Agriculture and Tourism

  • With more small farms than any county in the entire United States, we must support policies that ensure agriculture remains a vibrant and stable part of our North County economy. As the economics of farming grow more and more difficult, it’s important to protect the private property rights of farmers and oppose policies that could hurt our agricultural industry.

  • Work to connect farmers with researchers to improve techniques for growing, processing, packaging and distribution, and to introduce new products and create new market linkages to increase our agricultural sector competitiveness.

  • Developing a new generation of farmers is crucial to sustaining agriculture as an industry sector in our region. We should work with secondary education and others to promote agricultural career choices through creation of coursework, including business management as well as agriculture topics.

  • Support efforts to promote North County tourism and expand tourist destinations. This vital part of the economy provides jobs, visitors to hotels and restaurants, and dollars spent in our community.

Cut Red Tape

  • Ensure County government is operating as quickly and efficiently to provide new businesses with the opportunity to open their doors and begin hiring as soon as possible.

  • Support a regular review of county rules and regulations, to ensure we remove any unnecessary regulations that hamper business growth, eliminate duplicative regulations, and ensure the permit process is as streamlined as possible.

  • Allow residents and business to ‘flag’ regulations they deem to be unnecessary, costly, or duplicative. Regulations that receive a sufficient number of flags should receive priority review and require a policy response.

  • Hire a District 5 staff representative to serve as a business liaison to work directly with existing or prospective companies to help guide them through the resources available from county government to help them grow and expand.

Conclusion

North County has practically unlimited potential for economic growth and prosperity, but only if county government operates in a more efficient and collaborative manner. As your Supervisor, I’ll work hard to make it easier to do businesses to open their doors, grow, and ensure job opportunities for the next generation of North County residents.

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION FUNDING

Summary

North County residents deserve adequate transportation dollars -- my plan would deliver just that.

I opposed Measure A, the fraudulent SANDAG $18 billion sales tax increase. SANDAG misled voters about key facts. It neglected North County needs and it lacked accountability and transparency.  

 
After voters rightfully rejected this proposal and the SANDAG scandal that followed, it’s clear we need a new approach to transportation funding in our region. Under our current system, transportation is funded through an opaque process without adequate public input. Instead of a fair allocation of funds throughout the county, transportation funding tends to flow toward downtown San Diego interests.
 
Residents of North County deserve their fair share of transportation funding. With increasing congestion, unfilled potholes, and needed infrastructure repairs, it’s critical that we establish an efficient, effective, and equitable method of allocating transportation funding.
 
Accordingly, if elected Supervisor, my principles for transportation funding will be:

  1. ACCOUNTABILITY – Previous SANDAG transportation proposals have lacked accountability when it came to how the funds were spent. They have essentially provided a blank check in the form of multi-decade tax increases. Any future transportation plans should allocate funding based on whether or not prior deadlines were met, projects have been completed, and budgets have been followed. We shouldn’t be asking taxpayers to hand over more funds if those responsible have mismanaged taxpayer dollars.
     
  2. BALANCE – A key flaw of Measure A was its lack of funding for the types of projects that North County residents would benefit from. Rather than funding repairs to potholes in unincorporated areas or needed expansions of I-15 and SR-78, Measure A instead dedicated roughly 42 percent of funding to public transit and 14 percent to highways. This overwhelmingly benefited the City of San Diego while neglecting the needs of suburban North, East, and South County. Any future transportation funding must take a more careful approach to ensuring fair funding for all regions, not just those that are well-populated and politically influential.
     
  3. PUBLIC INPUT – Rather than solicit as much public input as possible, Measure A was mostly drawn up in a downtown office with minimal opportunity for citizens to share their transportation priorities. SANDAG then spent millions of dollars on public relations in an effort to sell their plan to the public. This was backwards, and an unfair use of taxpayer dollars. Future transportation proposals must incorporate significantly more public input in an open and transparent manner.
     
  4. REFORM – The Measure A projections scandal that occurred at SANDAG highlighted a much bigger problem: We’ve got a giant government bureaucracy making major decisions that impact every resident of our county, with very little direct accountability to taxpayers. In theory, the SANDAG bureaucracy is overseen by a board of directors composed of elected members of area city councils and the board of supervisors. But in practice, the board of directors mostly rubber-stamps the staff recommendations, and when was the last time a city councilmember won or lost a local election because of their voting record on SANDAG.

    We can either continue using the same failed methods for transportation funding, or we can establish a new approach that gives taxpayers what they deserve. Leaders throughout the region need to come together, go back to the drawing board, and establish a new process for allocating transportation funding that is transparent and accountable to voters.

Official Statement

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Supervisors – District No. 5

JEROME M. "JERRY" KERN

Councilmember

I am running for Supervisor to protect our quality of life and ensure North County receives the services we deserve.

I will fight to protect taxpayers, solve our traffic problems, protect public safety, and grow our local economy with good-paying jobs while standing up to downtown San Diego politicians and special interests who don’t understand or care about North County needs.

My wife and I have lived in North County for more than 40 years. I have served as a member of the armed forces, a public school teacher, founder of a pioneering charter school, president of the local Chamber of Commerce, and as an elected official with a record of standing up to special interests.

As an Oceanside Councilmember, I have fought to hold the line on city spending, supported projobs policies, upgraded police and fire protection, got tough on gang violence, and addressed homelessness. As a result, Oceanside has brought in high-paying jobs, vibrant restaurants, and new amenities to serve the public.

As Supervisor, I will be the effective advocate that North County deserves. That’s why I am supported by local elected officials and community leaders, not downtown politicians and special interests.

www.kernforsupervisor.com www.facebook.com/KernforSupervisor/

Candidate Contact Info

Email kernjm@hotmail.com
Board Member, San Dieguito Planning Group
16,482 votes (10.9%)
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My Top 3 Priorities

  • Prevent San Diego from turning into Orange County by reining in urban sprawl and building near existing infrastructure, while focusing on the affordability of housing
  • Reduce traffic congestion and gridlock by developing a forward-looking transportation vision incorporating world-class best practices
  • Protect public safety via investment in fire protection and emergency medical services, and by focusing on evacuation planning

Experience

Experience

Profession:Board Chair, Elfin Forest Harmony G Town Council
Board Member, San Dieguito Planning Group — Elected position (2009–current)
Board Chair, Elfin Forest Harmony Grove Town Council — Elected position (2005–current)
Principal and Founder, Analytique, Inc. (1994–2000)
International Marketing Manager, Hewlett-Packard Company (1986–1992)

Education

Institut Superieur de Gestion, France MBA, Business, Marketing, Finance (1981)
Institut d'Etudes Politiques, France Bachelors degree, Political Science and Economics (1979)

Community Activities

Board Member, San Dieguito Planning Group (2009–current)
Founder and president, Friends of the Creek, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving natural resources (2006–2012)
Fundraising Chair, San Dieguito Academy Foundation (2006–2008)
Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA), Voices for Children (2004–2005)

Biography

I am an immigrant and an American by choice who came here for the broad values that America represents: generous, inclusive, with freedom to be who you want to be instead of what your circumstances would dictate.

 I grew up on a small family farm in France where the labor included the children, like all working farms the world over. I know a thing or two about hard work, from mucking up cow stalls every day to harvesting grapes in October rain, and loading hay bales in impossibly small attics above the stable. We had dairy cows, cattle, and vineyards used to make Cognac, the brandy my hometown is famous for. No one in my family attended school past 8th grade, and the fate of farmer’s daughters back then did not include education.  Yet because of dedicated public school teachers who introduced me to books, and convinced my parents I should break the mold, I finished high school top in my class and went on to selective schools for college and business school. 

 Which is how I was able to get to America.

 I knew I had to leave my country of birth to pursue a career because at the time, regardless of your educational credentials or intellectual abilities, the ability to succeed was primarily determined by your social origins; the first question when you met someone new was “what does your father do”?  I saw the plum jobs in the graduating classes above me go to those who had family connections, not necessarily to the best and the brightest.

 So in the summer of 1980 I came to San Diego State University for a summer session as part of my MBA curriculum.  I paid for the trip expenses with a side modeling job, and I made it to California, the Eldorado that every French kid of my generation (and subsequent ones too!) dreams of visiting some day.  I fell in love with San Diego that summer.

 I remember as a child teaching myself English by singing along to records by Cat Stevens and Leonard Cohen, mouthing sounds to words I did not understand, but dreaming that one day I too would be rich and famous in America.  I imagined myself as a diplomat, or a journalist, or a businesswoman, traveling the world and operating in that incomprehensibly alluring language that was the lingua franca of freedom and liberation from the Old World’s social shackles.

 And in June 1981, I left the family farm for good, and got a one-way ticket to the land of opportunity.

 I was able to realize the dream that I left family, country and everything I knew behind for. Besides raising a family of two wonderful children with my husband of 30 years, for 20 years I started several tech companies right here in San Diego, creating many high paying good jobs; I also ran big organizations with employees around the world for a Fortune 500 company. Those business skills, earned the old-fashioned way, have prepared me well for the job of County Supervisor, an executive-level job co-managing 17,000 employees and a budget of $6 billion.

 When I sold my last company, I invested the same energy and drive into giving back to my community. I fundraised millions of $ for a public high school, I created a nonprofit to snatch some of the most valuable habitat in North County from the jaws of developers, and I have been an elected representative on my community’s Town Council since 2005, its Board chair since 2010, and a County Planning Group board member since 2009.  I have volunteered my time for the past decade and a half making sure the voices of San Diego County’s unincorporated areas would be heard by decision makers, and I have worked tirelessly representing the interests of the District Five community I have called home for the past 27 years. 

 During this time, I have watched with growing concern as many major decisions impacting these areas came down to a simple vote of three supervisors out of five, often with devastating results.  And I determined over time, that not all of the supervisors have the residents’ best interests at heart.  Because development interests play an oversize role in campaign contributions to Supervisors elections, they have back door access that the taxpayers and property owners simply cannot match. I was disheartened by the decision made by the Board to change the formula to give themselves raises, circumventing the process established to prevent exactly this type of self-dealing, while denying raises to their own employees. The refusal to hold evening meetings so citizens can have a meaningful opportunity to participate in deliberations affecting their quality of life was another recent disappointment.

 I decided the people of San Diego County deserve more.  I believe the Supervisors should truly represent the interests of the people of San Diego County.    I am tired of seeing bad decisions made with little transparency and little input from the residents who are most affected.  I’m not waiting any longer for a better Supervisor to appear.  With your support, I am that Supervisor.

 The stakes could not be higher, after 22 years of the same leadership. Voters have a chance to change the trajectory of San Diego’s future before we turn into Riverside or Orange County.  After 37 years of calling this County home, concerns over traffic, sprawl developments and wildfire evacuation safety  top the list of motivating factors for my run for this seat.  Land use and public safety are core issues facing the Board of Supervisors. The taxpayers deserve a Supervisor who will prioritize residents’ needs and safety, which is why I pledge not to accept any campaign contributions from developers.

 

 

Who supports this candidate?

Featured Endorsements

  • Pam Slater-Price, former District 3 County Supervisor
  • Jerry Harmon, former mayor of Escondido
  • Eric Anderson, former President, San Diego County Farm Bureau

Organizations (6)

  • Preserve Wild Santee
  • League Of Conservation Voters
  • Sierra Club
  • Escondido Chamber of Citizens
  • Torrey Pines Democratic Club
  • San Diego Democrats for Environmental Action

Individuals (19)

  • Lael Montgomery, Former Valley Center Design Review Committee Chair
  • Janean Huston, Board member, Friends of Eden Valley for Responsible Development
  • Scott Sutherland, President, Western Fasteners
  • Jon Dummer, President, Surface optics
  • Mark Jackson, No on B campaign co-leader
  • Andy Laderman, Board member, Friends of Eden Valley for Responsible Development
  • Tony DeBellis, former Inglewood City Planning Manager
  • Nancy Goodrich, former San Diego Police Assistant Chief
  • Kevin Barnard, former President, The Escondido Creek Conservancy
  • Diane Coombs, President, San Diegans for Managed Growth
  • George Courser, Conservation chair, Sierra Club
  • Dan Silver, Endangered Habitats League
  • Duncan McFetridge, Founder, Cleveland National Forest
  • Michael Beck, San Diego County Planning Commissioner
  • Phil Pryde, former Chair, San Diego County Planning Commission
  • Thomas McAndrews, former Pauma Valley Planning Group Chair
  • James Gordon, No on B campaign co-leader
  • Melanie Fallon, former Los Angeles City Planning Director
  • Laura Hunter, former Environmental Health Coalition Campaign Director

Questions & Answers

Questions from KPBS and the League of Women Voters (San Diego and North County San Diego chapters) (6)

Should the county spend more of its budget reserves on increasing social services? Why or why not?
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

Coming as I do from a small farm background where my family experienced both years with abundant crops and lean years when the weather did not cooperate, and we had to live off previous years savings, as well as based on my background as an entrepreneur having to meet payroll every two weeks and being responsible for these families livelihoods, I am a fiscal conservative who feels strongly that existing budget reserves should not be spent wantonly, but instead invested carefully to return a benefit in quality of life improvement to San Diegans.  As such I would prioritize one-time, capital improvement type investments, as opposed to creating ongoing budget liabilities moving forward.  Voters should also examine for themselves the claims made by some candidates as to the extent and size of available reserves that could be spent; careful examination will reveal it is considerably less than $1.7 billion as claimed.

San Diego is also at the mercy of the next wildfire storm, earthquake or tsunami, not to mention a widely predicted downturn in the economy in the next two years.

For an example of a capital investment, the County can investigate ways to increase the supply of housing for middle-income San Diegans by considering innovative solutions such as purchasing and/or building or renovating housing as a retention and recruiting tool for certain classes of public employees such as firefighters, sheriffs, nurses and teachers so they can enjoy better quality of life by living closer to work, but also decrease the traffic on our freeways. 

That said, I would support limited and carefully vetted increases in mental heath programs once my team has had a chance to examine and review the opportunities and associated cost/benefit. Mental health is already a significant cost to the County through caring for the third or so of the prison population afflicted with related issues, as well as one of the causes of homelessness, especially in our veterans.  In addition, one in three retiring San Diegans is expected to get a diagnosis of dementia in the decade to come, which will increase the need for associated care. 

 

Should the county invest more of its budget reserves in its affordable housing trust fund? Why or why not?
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

With 3,500 affordable units having been lost in the last 20 years and over 9,000 homeless people on our streets, the $25 million already allocated by the current Board of Supervisors towards the Innovative Housing Trust Fund is the right start.  The goal is to create 600 to 1,000 units, clearly short of solving the problem on its own. My first inclination would be to investigate opportunities to further partner with private entities to leverage public funding, before investing more of the budget reserves into that program. However given the size of the challenge it is likely that more funding might be warranted, once results from this pilot program are analyzed for effectiveness.

Tackling the affordability of housing also needs to include both the market-rate and the subsidized sides of the equation. 

We need to adopt an inclusionary ordinance in the unincorporated County, as the City of San Diego and most other cities have done to ensure affordable housing gets built along with market-rate housing, ideally onsite so we create mixed-income vibrant neighborhoods like other successful counties of our size. We also need to help streamline the approval process for the 52,000 units already approved in the General Plan to make it faster for builders to get them built.

Do you support measures to stop the criminalization of homelessness? The basic human behaviors of many homeless people (like sitting, sleeping and bathing in public) are against the law. Please provide specific examples of measures you would support.
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

Encroachment tickets do not solve anything since the recipients are unlikely to be able to pay them. On the other hand, public bathing presents some potential public health issues and should be discouraged; instead organizations like Think Dignity, with their mobile shower options, should be supported. The solution is to provide permanent housing, and even more importantly, to consider the factors that lead to homelessness, such as mental health issues or youth delinquency where the County might intervene much earlier in the pipeline to prevent more San Diegans from becoming homeless.

Do you support increasing housing density in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

I support the increased density which is already planned as a part of the County General Plan, adopted in August 2011. That density is properly situated near existing villages where infrastructure such as alternative transportation and sufficient road network already exist. We spent 13 years and $18 million painstakingly planning for that density pattern and we should now follow the plan. 

What I don't support is greenfield development in locations which were deemed unsuitable for high density during the planning process, such as very high fire risk areas, high value habitat corridors, and where the road network does not support the increased proposed density.

The rule should be that density follows infrastructure, not the reverse. In other words we should first evaluate what infrastructure exists, and determine what housing density can be accomodated in terms of schools, roads, fire fighting resources, transit, and the like. Too often the County does the reverse, allowing increased density without considering the impact on the infrastructure. This can lead to literally deadly consequences when too many residents are placed in very high fire risk areas without the road network sufficient to allow for swift emergency evacuation.

Do you support permitting, regulating and taxing marijuana in unincorporated San Diego County? Why or why not?
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

Given that 57% of San Diegans voted to legalize recreational cannabis, the role of government is to regulate its responsible use such that the public has safe access to quality-controlled products, both for medical and recreational purposes.  Currently in spite of valiant law enforcement efforts, a number of black market outlets are in operation where the product quality is not monitored, which could lead to health and safety issues for the consuming public

The National Institutes of Health has funded research indicating that opiate abuse decreases in states with legal cannabis.  Other research points to a decrease in youth drug use in those same states.

From an economic perspective, it is important to give our local farmers an opportunity to continue to thrive by allowing them to grow what is a legal crop in California, especially given its relatively low-water need.  A thriving and well regulated cannabis industry can create jobs, and generate tax revenue to fund County functions, including the enhanced law enforcement needed to deal with the illegal retail establishments.

I would start with the ordinance the County Planning Commission approved unanimously in 2016, after extensive consultation with stakeholders in the backcountry (which was not approved by the Board of Supervisors). There are three facets to managing cannabis in the County:

  • allow for cultivation as a legal crop so our local farmers can take advantage of the lower water requirements and profit potential
  • allow for enough distribution points to eliminate illegal outlets
  • dedicate enough law enforcement resources to shutting down those remaining black market sites which pose a public health problem 

We also need to be mindful of the fact that if government does not act, the industry could attempt to legislate via the ballot box by passing an initiative, which may not contain the provisions we would like to see.

Do you support the county’s Climate Action Plan? Why or why not?                                          
Answer from Jacqueline Arsivaud:

I do not.

The County CAP is fundamentally flawed in that it enables sprawl development, a major contributor to climate change and overburdened freeways, and does not properly mitigate the impact of such overdevelopment.  By allowing the extensive use of carbon offsets anywhere in the world with little to no monitoring, instead of mitigating for impacts in the locale they are created, the County CAP gives a green light to sprawl in the form of General Plan Amendments, and to ever more congested freeways, impacting the quality of life of all San Diegans.  The number one factor in determining the environmental impact of development is location, because 40% of emissions come from cars, yet the CAP fails to consider the County’s largest source of greenhouse (GHG) emissions – on-road transportation.  None of the Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMT) reduction measures apply to residential developments despite the fact that VMT reduction measures are most needed in the residential land use context. 

The CAP should encourage development where the General Plan directs it, close to infrastructure and employment centers, which reduces cars on the roads and Vehicles Miles Traveled (VMTs).  Instead the CAP relies too much on carbon offsets in 2030 and has no mitigation plan for 2050. It also fails to account for induced travel from expanded roadway capacity – both for new County roads, and for regional road expansion. We know from other studies that as soon as freeways are widened, traffic increases to fill all available capacity.  Finally the CAP misses an opportunity to utilize transit in any significant way to meet target emissions.

It is unfortunate that the County missed an opportunity to lead by developing a CAP that effectively addressed the air pollution and GHG emissions that affect the quality of life of all San Diegans, by emphasizing transit and alternative transportation instead of freeway widening, and discouraging far-flung General Plan Amendments which contravene the sound guiding principles that were the basis for the recently completed County General Plan at a cost of $18 millions to taxpayers. The courts have affirmed over and over that the direction taken by the Board of Supervisors needed to change, but instead they have chosen to incur more legal expenses to protect the interests of a narrow group of special interests advocating for sprawl and freeway congestion.

Official Statement

Researched by Voter’s Edge
Source: San Diego County Registrar of Voters

COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO

Board of Supervisors – District No. 5

JACQUELINE ARSIVAUD

Entrepreneur/Community Leader

Public trust is being eroded because our supervisors don’t stick to the rules—the very rules they’ve created.

I won’t take campaign donations from developers so I can make land use decisions untainted by appearance of back door dealing. I’ll publish my meeting calendar, work with colleagues to roll back the supervisors’ pay increases, hold evening meetings to accommodate the public, and expedite regulations for building where consistent with the General Plan. Novel solutions to housing affordability are possible without paving over the countryside. I’ll create opportunity for working families to help limit long commutes.

I’m a successful tech industry businesswoman uniquely positioned to bring tech jobs and develop a seed fund to encourage local start-ups. I will protect the County's fiscal integrity because I understand how to manage finances.

I’ve served my community pro bono for more than a decade and led our effort to update the County’s General Plan. I know how to craft win-win solutions for San Diego County.

We need a supervisor who will fight against elite special interests who’ve dominated County politics.

Let’s define our own future and preserve our quality of life. I would be honored to have your vote.

www.Jacquelinefor2018.com.

Candidate Contact Info

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