presents
Voter’s Edge California
Get the facts before you vote.
Brought to you by
MapLight
League of Women Voters of California Education Fund
KPCC's My Ballot@KPCC
June 7, 2016 — California Primary Election
County

Los Angeles CountyCandidate for Supervisor, District 5

Photo of Billy Malone

Billy Malone

Town Council Member
8,701 votes (2.44%)
Use tab to activate the candidate button. Use "return" to select this candidate. You can access your list by navigating to 'My Choices'.
For more in-depth information on this candidate, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.
Candidate has provided information.
Thank candidate for sharing their information on Voter's Edge.

My Top 3 Priorities

  • Public transit: increase the use of public transportation focusing on the impediments of the transit process
  • Preserve LA: the historical, cultural, and natural offerings of Los Angeles while encouraging and exploring responsible economical growth with an emphasis on runaway films and its impact on the film industry and its indirectly related industries
  • Quality of Life. Affordable Housing and healthcare: emphasis on prevention in the most susceptible social groups: low income, seniors, homeless, veterans, disabled, children

Experience

Experience

Profession:Real Estate Broker
Real Estate Broker, Sun Realtors (2009–current)
Council Member, Altadena Town Council — Elected position (2013–current)
President, Chamber of Commerce — Elected position (2015–current)
Committee member, Altadena Land Use Committee — Elected position (2013–current)

Education

Cal State Los Angeles BA, Theater (1999)
American Academy of Dramatic Arts AA, Performing Arts (1995)
Highbury Technical College HND, Engineering (1981)
South Downs College ONC, Engineering (1979)

Community Activities

Founder, Public School Performance Program (2011–current)
Founder, Super Pack - Performing Arts Camp for Kids (2014–current)

Biography

 

 

·       Have an engineering background

 

·       Lived in LA County 5th district 24 years

 

·       Long time union member of many unions, currently a member of two

 

·       Town council member, executive committee

 

·       Chamber of Commerce Altadena – President

 

·       Got into politics as an advocate

 

 

 

Who supports this candidate?

Elected Officials (1)

  • Okorie Ezieme, Council Member

Individuals (2)

  • Dr. Donald Lowe, Max Steineke Professor, PhD.
  • Michael Miser, Fire Marshall

Questions & Answers

Questions from The League of Women Voters of Los Angeles County ILO and California Counts, a public media collaboration (5)

Homelessness is a major concern in Los Angeles County.  What role can and should the County government play in resolving homelessness? In your answer please specifically address how the county should pay for homeless services.
Answer from Billy Malone:

 

If you truly wish to combat homelessness then you have to look at the cause of homelessness and address those issues specifically.  If we only focus on the homeless themselves without addressing the root cause of why someone is homeless, we are doing a disservice not only to the homeless themselves but to the community in general.  It is by this approach and this approach only that we will not only help those who are homeless but cure the larger issue by preventing those from becoming homeless.  Prevention is always a fraction of the cost of a cure. 

 

 

 

Approximately one-third of the homeless population suffer from serious untreated mental illness.  Unfortunately the mentally ill homeless have become an acceptable part of urban living.  Approximately 40% of the incarcerated population suffer from mental illness and go untreated, only to end up homeless once released.  Additionally, it has become common practice that mental health patients are dumped on the streets and into public shelters rather than being provided proper hospital care in the effort to save money, but in the end the expense of managing these individuals is passed on to taxpayers and society.  The mental health homeless population will only continue to increase unless we take action now.  Once a person has entered into the system via social services, judicial or otherwise and identified as having mental health issues, services need to be available immediately as well as for future follow-ups for that individual.

 

 

 

Approximately 8% of the homeless population are veterans. To lesson the risk of homeless veterans we need better medical services, job placement, housing assistance and be able to identify the at-risk group be it social, economical, or health issues like PTSD, which takes us full circle back to the mental health issue.  

 

 

 

36% of California foster youth become homeless within 18 months of aging out.  There needs to be more oversight, accountability and responsibility for the children in our care.  When a child is in the system, the county is their guardian and as their guardian, the county needs to ensure they have a safe, secure, and supportive environment.  After aging-out, less than 1% will graduate from college.  The correlation between education and success is recognized.  Foster youth need opportunities to be successful:  work with local technical schools to offer training in trades along with subsidized housing while learning these skills; increase the ability to obtain federal grants and scholarships and subsidized education in higher education institutions.  It benefits not only these individuals but society as a whole if they are employable after aging out, becoming productive members of society and given a chance in life instead of adding to the homeless population.

 

 

 

It is only by addressing the issue of what makes a person homeless in the first place that you can truly attack the homeless crisis.  Otherwise, the flood gates remain open no matter what you do to support those already on the streets.

 

Many in Los Angeles County cannot afford to rent or buy their own home. How do you propose to make it easier to afford housing?
Answer from Billy Malone:

 

As populations migrate to more urban areas this has become a major issue for most major cities and populated areas, not just Los Angeles county.  Prices on homes will continue to increase and finding affordable housing will become more difficult unless we can solve supply and demand of which presently, there is a lack of supply in relation to demand. We have used up most of the land for development in our cities and are now reaching out to less dense and more rural communities.  However, we should never develop just for development sake, we need to be responsible or we will lose our natural resources and wilderness spaces and potentially see more disasters like the recent gas leak at Aliso Canyon.  The modern urban environment already exists with high-density construction around transportation corridors.  High-density construction, with a focus on building upwards is a way to support supply and demand, however there has been an excess of higher-end expensive units.  While we are seeing one need met we are moving away from another.  We should not just be encouraging development but ensuring these are mixed usage with a percentage of all new large construction allocated to affordable housing.

 

 

 

Along with rent control many other programs should and can be adopted. For example, properties acquired by county via property tax default or bankruptcies could be converted to affordable housing rather than sold off to investors for a fraction of their value which are subsequently remodeled and sold at a premium; work in partnership with corporations or foundations to create affordable housing county-wide; work with individual communities and support local initiatives to support affordable housing.

 

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors approved a raise of the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2020 for unincorporated areas in the county. Some business owners say the hike in wages will eliminate jobs. What solutions do you propose to encourage job growth in the county?
Answer from Billy Malone:

 

Unincorporated Los Angeles County has a substantial small business community that often find it hard to compete with the larger entities and corporations that exist in the larger incorporated cities.  In light of the $15 dollar per hour raise in the minimum wage voted by the County Board of Supervisors, this would only add to the issue of being competitive.  As a president of a Chamber of Commerce in unincorporated county I am only too familiar with small businesses and their struggle to survive.  Until now there has been concern on how to balance the discrepancy of minimum wage differences between communities and still be successful.  As of Monday, March 29th, Governor Jerry Brown announced a deal to raise the minimum wage in California to $15/hour by 2022.  This levels the playing field for all business in the entire state of California.  It is no longer a question of whether one agrees or disagrees with a wage increase, that fact has already been decided.  As mentioned before, most small business competition is from other local communities, however, with a level playing field it is not about how to make and keep business within unincorporated Los Angeles but how to keep businesses successful in all of our communities period.  Doing business should never be considered a burden but encouraged, and the current environment is not very supportive of small business establishment.  Permit fees should be kept to a minimum, the process should be simplified and put on a fast track through the county process.  Many new businesses have to wait months to open due to lengthy and cumbersome permit processes, this shouldn’t even be an issue.  Every day a business fails to open, it is costing the investor more money in lost income and creating more risk of failure.  We need to focus on encouraging, not discouraging, business growth, especially small business.

 

 

 

Now that the state is looking at a $15/hour wage we need to all work together on finding ways to encourage businesses to move to California and not run away to states that have low wages and less taxes.  This is a good example of a multifaceted issue that can only be solved not by focusing on LA County alone but on all areas of the state.  Trade partnerships within our state will always be in our best interest and benefit us all.

 

Climate changes and the continuing drought worry many in Los Angeles County. What new strategies should the Board of Supervisors implement to ensure that Los Angeles is able to both satisfy its water needs and protect the environment? Please be specific.
Answer from Billy Malone:

 

As population increases and water tables and reservoirs decrease, water has to be the number one issue that we all face especially with the drought of recent years, and add to this equation that California is expecting a growth of 10 million over the next few years.  There is no simple or single answer to this question, yet again it is multifaceted.  We need to look at recycled/reclaimed water similar to Orange County, storm water capture, use of grey water in more industrial environments, better regulation during high shortage times like present, incentives for low use and regulation on overuse, repairs and replacement of infrastructure: 8 billion gallons a year are lost due to failing infrastructure alone and current replacement of an aging system is far behind what it should be.  We need to replace at twice the rate with 3 times the investment just to fulfill the life expectancy of existing aging-out water mains.  We have more water districts than almost anywhere else.  One small community like Altadena has 4 different water boards alone.  Consider this county-wide and we add issues with legislation and regulation over so many water boards.  

 

What steps, beyond a citizens' commission, should Supervisors take in preventing abuses within the Los Angeles Sheriff's department?
Answer from Billy Malone:

 

The abuse and scandal that rocked the Sheriff’s department was an embarrassment not only to the Sheriff’s department but to the Board of Supervisors.  It was assumed that the Supervisors never took the situation seriously nor believed the situation was as bad as it was until it became public.  Now that it is common knowledge we need to make sure it never happens again and the citizens’ commission is a good start.  The Board of Supervisors need to work together, beyond a citizens’ commission, and hold those in the highest positions accountable through independent reviews, departmental budgeting, technological advancements, and to continue to work to give the commission the ability and strength to uphold its duties without conflict of interest. 

 

 

 

Last year, the LA County Sheriff’s Department alone spent $61 million on litigation, up 50%—$20 million—over the previous year’s $40 million.  The excessive force cost was up nearly $10 million over the previous year.  LA County Supervisor Hilda Solis stated it best when she made the comment, “Every cent the county spends on litigation is precious funding that we cannot use to house the homeless, promote better health and wellness for children, upskill our workforce and provide countless other needed services to our communities.”  Abuse in the Sheriff’s department is directly responsible for this drain of funds. 

 

Political Beliefs

Political Philosophy

I believe that if one truly wishes to pursue public office, the motive has to be about the needs of those one represents placed well above one’s own.  Public service and politics is a unique position where you actually work for the people who work for you.  For this reason the position should never be taken lightly nor should it be viewed as an individual’s career stepping stone, but for the purpose of making positive changes and policy that represent the interests and needs of the constituency.  A career should only be a side effect of the position served and no more, otherwise one’s own interests will come before the people, the very people you are supposed to represent.  To reword a popular saying, “All public servants are politicians, but not all politicians are public servants.”

Please share this site to help others research their voting choices.

PUBLISHING:PRODUCTION SERVER:PRODUCTION